Thrifting Chronicles: $3 DIY Polka Dot Bow Blouse

*Nordstrom’s Half-Yearly sale starts today! I haven’t looked yet, so please let me know any good finds : )*diydot5

I showed this blouse a while back and received several requests for a tutorial. Unfortunately, I didn’t document the process very well as I was just experimenting around. I’m not a professional sewer, so these steps are just to show what I did and are not intended as instructions!

Earlier this year, I couldn’t get enough of feminine tie-neck blouses. I wasn’t in love with the options out on the market due to either fit, quality, or price points, thus ventured out to Savers thrift store. I zoomed through the racks looking for items that were:

– either in nice fabrics (silk, wool, etc) or interesting prints
– had a collar
– affordable enough to experiment with

I like shopping thrift stores for “fabric” versus going to regular fabric stores, because you can find nice, unique materials for cheap, plus, you can take advantage of existing features like button plackets or collars. It’s all about seeing the potential. The collar feature was key for me, as it makes a piece so much more versatile (see last photo in post). After a dizzying spin through the store, I ended up with this monster of a dowdy shirt for $2.99:
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Using a loosely-cut sleeveless blouse from H&M; as a template, I dissected the shirt into five pieces: 1 torso, 2 pieces from sleeves to join together as the necktie, and 2 pieces from sleeves to finish raw edges on the armholes…

After snipping off the sleeves and slimming the sides of the torso, I noticed a fit issue. There was an unsightly gap, almost like an air bubble, near the armpit. Professional sewers would’ve known better to insert bust darts ahead of time, but I learned my lesson afterwards. The purpose of bust darts are simple – the front of your body is not flat as a sheet, so darts are necessary for allowing the fabric to contour against the curved portion of your chest and arms. 
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Again, I used my H&M; shell as a guide for dart size and placement:

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Next, you may have noticed that the edges of the armholes were raw and unsightly after the sleeves got snipped off. I’m sure there are a few ways to take care of this, but I ended up using some material from the sleeves to wrap around the raw edges.
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Finished armholes:

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Finally, I joined together the long sleeve strips to make the neck tie. The two strips were not long enough to tie a blow, so I had to salvage more scraps here and there to add a third joint. Definitely making use of every last bit of the $2.99!
diydot3I’ve also worn this blouse with a solid black sash as the tie and it worked nicely. If you have existing collared blouses – try looping a long, thin sash (or fabric belts from other garments) around the neck to add some bow-tie flavor. Just make sure the material is lightweight or else it will droop heavily and not retain a perky bow shape.

Finished product once again, and another outfit showing the versatility of a pretty collar:

diydot6 On a last note, many of you have asked for sewing machine recommendations. I’ve used the same old Brother machine for over 10 years. The model is no longer made, but it has just the basic few stitches and has served me well as a beginner’s machine. It looks very similar to this lightweight 10-stitch Brother machine which is more affordable than most options.

Readers – Do you like to re-purpose items from the thrift store?

I won’t be able to answer any comments, questions or emails until June. Thank you for your patience!
When you purchase through the links on this blog, I may earn a commission. Thank you for your support!

When you purchase through the links on this blog, I may earn a commission. Thank you for your support!

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